Environment & Energy Insights

Greenhouse Gas Quantification Under FERC’s Pipeline Certification Process

Posted by Jeffrey Karp on 7/30/19 11:43 AM

By  Jeffrey Karp and Maxwell Unterhalter

Since our last article discussing the way in which the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC" or "the Commission") considers greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate impacts in the pipeline certification process, the conflict has not abated. Presently, the Commission has just four members; a fifth member has not been appointed by the President since the death of Commissioner McIntyre on January 2, 2019.[1] With no nominee to replace the late Commissioner McIntyre, the remaining two Democratic and two Republican commissioners have stalemated over whether FERC is adequately fulfilling its National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”) responsibilities in evaluating certification applications for natural gas pipelines.[2] The lack of consensus among the four commissioners has slowed the certification of proposed pipeline projects, leading to cancellation of at least one application.[3]

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Topics: Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Natural Gas, Energy Projects, FERC

FERC Continues to Forge Its Own Path in Considering Climate Impacts in Pipeline Applications

Posted by Jeffrey Karp on 1/14/19 5:18 PM

By Jeffrey Karp and Kevin Fink

Among other responsibilities, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC" or "the Commission") approves and issues construction certificates for interstate gas pipelines and related infrastructure under section 7 of the Natural Gas Act ("NGA"). Section 7(c) of the NGA requires that any person seeking to construct or operate a facility for the transportation of natural gas in interstate commerce must obtain a certificate of public convenience and necessity from FERC. FERC’s 1999 Statement of Policy - Certification of New Interstate Natural Gas Pipeline Facilities - outlines the evaluation standard for issuing a certificate of public convenience and necessity. Once a certificate application is filed, the gating question is whether the project can go forward without subsidization by the pipeline’s existing customers. If that threshold requirement is met, FERC determines whether the applicant has sought to eliminate or minimize adverse effects on existing customers, existing pipelines in the market and their customers or landowners and communities affected by the route of the new pipeline. If the proposed project has no adverse effects, the Commission proceeds to a preliminary determination or a final order. However, if there are residual adverse effects - after efforts have been made to minimize them - FERC balances the evidence of public benefits achieved against the residual adverse effects in a economic test, and then proceeds to environmental and other reviews if the benefits outweigh the adverse effects.

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Topics: FERC, National Environmental Policy Act, Natural Gas Act

Grid–Scale Energy Storage: Stakeholder Participation Key to Successful Implementation of FERC Order 841

Posted by Jeffrey Karp on 8/8/18 5:11 PM

In recent posts, we have discussed how Order 841 issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”) on February 15, 2018 is expected to create new opportunities for the expansion of grid-scale (“in front of the meter”) energy storage. Order 841 is intended to encourage deployment of energy storage by addressing participation of energy storage resources in wholesale electricity markets operated by Regional Transmission Organizations (“RTOs”) and Independent System Operators (“ISOs”).  

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Topics: Energy Storage, FERC, Order 841

Energy Storage and Hydropower Experts Offer Industry Perspectives at 2018 Grid Scale Energy Storage Summit

Posted by Administrator on 7/23/18 1:26 PM

By Kevin Fink

Sullivan counsel recently participated in the “Grid Scale Energy Storage Summit,” part of the expansive Hydrovision International conference held at the end of June in Charlotte, North Carolina. For the first time on an international scale, the Summit brought together both energy storage and hydropower experts from around the world for the purpose of debating, among other things, the future role of hydropower in the mix of energy storage options.  

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Topics: Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, FERC, hydropower

FERC ENERGY STORAGE RULE CREATES NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR SMALL, LOW-IMPACT HYDROPOWER PROJECTS

Posted by Administrator on 2/28/18 3:49 PM

By Edward Woll Jr.

OVERVIEW

The United States has produced clean, renewable electricity from hydropower for more than 100 years. Today there are approximately 2,500 domestic dams and pumped-storage facilities that provide roughly 100 gigawatts (“GW”) of electricity. In addition, there are more than 80,000 non-powered dams, i.e., existing structures that could produce power, with the potential capacity of 12 GW. New England’s non-powered dams potential capacity is 243 mega watts (“MW”).  Many of the 80,000 non-powered dams could be converted to produce hydropower at relatively low cost and within a relatively short timeframe. See U.S. Department of Energy, An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States (2012).
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Topics: Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Massachusetts, Low-head hydropower, FERC, hydropower

Sullivan

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The Environment & Energy Insights blog analyzes developments in the law, as well as provides updates and perspectives on trends and polices.

The material on this site is for general information only and is not legal advice. No liability is accepted for any loss or damage which may result from reliance on it. Always consult a qualified lawyer about a specific legal problem.

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